Halfway house: The big Bonnie neatly spans the gap between modern and classic

PHOTOS BY Chris Dickinson

CONTINUING OUR THEME, Triumph’s 750 twins are an obvious choice for anyone contemplating the purchase of a first British classic bike. They don’t cost a fortune compared to the more prestigious earlier classics, so you can try an old Brit bike to see if you enjoy the experience without mortgaging the cat.

The debate continues about which is the best of the very many Bonnie 750s, but this one surely comes close. Late fuel tank, great seat, comfortable bars and peashooters to mark your passage
The debate continues about which is the best of the very many Bonnie 750s, but this one surely comes close. Late fuel tank, great seat, comfortable bars and peashooters to mark your passage

There are heaps of 750 Triumphs on the market at any time, so you have plenty to pick and choose between. Spares supply is superb: there are several specialists dedicated to these machines and their development has continued in recent years, using modern technology to improve the electrics, comfort, steering and stopping. You can personalise one of these Triumph twins to your heart’s content…

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Production of the 750s started in 1973 with the twin-carb T140V Bonneville and the single-carb TR7V Tiger, direct descendants from the Speed Twin all those decades earlier. The first few 750s were actually 724cc but the vast majority were 744cc (76mm by 82mm) from 1974 onwards.

The 750 Triumphs do everything fairly well, although they tend not to excel at one thing in particular – apart, perhaps, from steering rather more sharply than some lumbering four-cylinder contemporaries from overseas.

Read more in December’s issue of CBG

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